Cloudcatcher: Ginko No.48 (summer) Lennox Head

Thursday, 1 February 2018

The Cloudcatcher summer ginko is generally held the first week after school goes back. This year it also happened to be the first day of the ‘cool change’ and it rained. A hurried ring-around altered the meeting place from Lake Ainsworth to a picnic shelter in the town, with a short walk to the beach. The surf had been predicted as ‘hazardous’, and indeed looked really wild, with an offshore wind holding up the curves of the numerous white-topped milky-grey waves. However, through the drizzle we discerned half a dozen boardriders taking up the challenge, and rewarded with some glorious rides. A row of seagulls lined the fence, facing into the strong breeze to hold their feathers back, swallows flew up and down the steps to the beach, and a pelican chose the highest pole to keep an eye on it all.

Seven of us around the table read from the recent issue of Windfall, specifically the five haiku by Cloudcatchers included in it. We tried the new method of reading haiku as reported in HaikuOz by Jan Dodd (suggested by her American visitor Sheila Sondik): L1, then L1 & L2, then L1 & L2 & L3. However there was a consensus of opinion that this interfered with the placement of the keriji, and the two-part nature of a traditional haiku presentation, so we decided not to implement this procedure in the future. Continue reading “Cloudcatcher: Ginko No.48 (summer) Lennox Head”

The Healing Power of Haiku: Maureen Sexton

Bee on flowerI met the late WA haiku poet, Nicholas Barwell, in 2005 and there began years of discussions about haiku and my first attempts at writing haiku. Following this, I was fortunate to be offered, and to complete, an intense mentorship (writing, researching, critiquing and workshopping of haiku for publication) with mentor, John Bird, in 2007. I am so grateful to both of these people for the excellent grounding they gave me in haiku and the development of my love for haiku.

Since then, and after much research and experience, I have learned that haiku can be so much more than a form of poetry. It can also be a lifestyle, a healing tool, and a tool for environmental activism. Continue reading “The Healing Power of Haiku: Maureen Sexton”

Eucalypt e-Newsletter

The February 2018 Eucalypt: a tanka journal e-Newsletter is now online. Included are the Scribble Awards from issue 23, Book Notes, items of interest on the web, submission and subscription details and an engaging writing challenge you might like to try.

warm wishes

Julie Thorndyke
Editor, Eucalypt: a tanka journal

 

Members’ News January, 2018

Well there goes January in a flash and here we go into February . . .

We have managed to catch a few snippets of last month’s news, and thank you again to all those who have sent items to share with our readers.

Haiku Musings

It is usually of great interest as well as instructional to reflect on what haiku means to others, this is certainly the case here. We continue with our series of thoughtful reflections on haiku with the publication of My Writing Practice by Dawn Bruce and Why Haiku by Lorin Ford.

These are best read in the quiet zone, unhurried and perhaps with a cup of tea. Continue reading “Members’ News January, 2018”