WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 4

Dawn Bruce (Sydney, NSW)

‘The writing of haiku captures a moment that reveals the extraordinary in the ordinary; it allows one to slow down and value the present; it enables one to forget the ego and feel the miracle of nature; more than anything it is the heart of poetry.’
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Alison Williams (UK)
‘A haiku is a short poem that finds the intangible in the tangible.’

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Janet Howie (Melbourne, Vic)

‘Haiku is a concise poetic form that captures a keenly perceived and felt moment in nature, leading to further reflection on universal human experience.’
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Merle Packham (Alstonville, NSW)

“A haiku is a brief poem expressing a moment of observation, with
awareness of all the senses to nature, the seasons, and one’s
surroundings.”

What is Haiku? – Week 3

Katherine Gallagher (UK)

(1) “Haiku is a brief season-oriented poem of Japanese origin but
increasingly adapted to Western usage and local tastes. A haiku mirrors
a moment’s experience often shown via contrasting images – the so-called
‘haiku moment’ bringing about a. sudden illumination to dramatic
effect.”

(2) and Katherine’s short description:
“Haiku is a brief poem about the sensory vibrancy of the planet.”

Maureen Sexton (Perth, WA)
“Haiku exalts nature by recording, in as few words as possible,
something from the natural world that creates an insight which
resonates with the reader.”

What is Haiku – Week 2

Dhugal Lindsay (Yokosuka, Japan) believes English language haiku should aspire to be:

“Short poem of rhythmical structure, usually between 7 and 17 syllables in length. It contains a reference to a seasonal or otherwise natural entity, is concrete, and illuminates some aspect of the existence of one or more of the elements or entities within the poem.”

Dhugal and John Bird collaborated for this short description:

“A haiku is a brief poem, built on sensory images from the environment. It evokes an insight into Our world and The world.”

Cynthia Ludlow (Brisbane, Qld)

“Haiku are small nature poems that I don’t understand but know to be true.”

What is Haiku? – Week 1

What is Haiku?

Today we begin a weekly display of members’ responses to the question:
What is haiku? Our hope is that by sharing our responses (definitions,
descriptions, comments, or quotations of wise words by others) we will
achieve a broader and more sympathetic understanding of this poetry we
love.

Quendryth Young (Alstonville, NSW)

‘A haiku is a short poem of traditional Japanese origin which
captures the essence of a moment, finds the extraordinary in the
ordinary, and links nature to human nature.’

Kevin Sharpe (Blue Mountains, NSW) responds:

‘haiku, senryu : of the moment’

Nicholas Barwell (Perth, WA) endorses Harold Stewarts’s definition:

“Haiku try to express what Japanese call Mono No Aware, the
ah!ness of things: a feeling for natural loveliness tinged with a
sadness at its transience.”

Thanks to Quendryth, Kevin and Nicholas for sharing these.
Can you answer THE question in less than forty words.? Then please tell
John Bird at  link removed He is is editing this feature for us.

Defining haiku

In 2007 the Australian Haiku Society committee requested John Bird to advise the Society on haiku definition(s) and to try to formulate one that we could adopt, officially, as meaningful for our members and helpful to those new to the genre.

John reports that he has considered many descriptions and definitions of haiku by overseas writers and now wants to understand how Australian poets, at all levels of experience, think about haiku.

He hopes to include some examples of the latter in his published report and would like to share a subset of these on the Australian Haiku Society [HaikuOz] site, if this is agreed to by their authors. If you would like your views to remain anonymous, please say so at the time you submit them. This will be respected.

Haiku are elusive to define. But in attempting to describe them we may come to understand them better. Please don’t feel intimidated that your definition must be academic, or even wise. It’s simply what you think haiku are about that counts. Please send John your personal definition of haiku, whether long-standing or written for this exercise, at: link removed

Please try to restrict your thoughts to 40 words, preferably no more than 25. If you have adopted a published definition written by somebody else, please include all details.

Below are two personal definitions of haiku. You are warmly invited to share yours.

Beverley George
President
Australian Haiku Society
www.haikuoz.org

Continue reading “Defining haiku”

John Bird appointed to consider haiku definitions

Haiku Definitions- appointment

On behalf of the committee of the Australian Haiku Society I am pleased to announce the appointment of John Bird
to act on behalf of the Australian Haiku Society to consider the following questions and make recommendations to the Society on:
1. What haiku-related terms, if any, should the Australian Haiku Society define for its members?
2. What wording should be used in any such definitions?
3. What supporting or clarifying notes are required?
4. How should the Australian Haiku Society definitions be adopted and promulgated?

Beverley M George
President, Australian Haiku Society