Review of “Prospect Five” – Dorothy McLaughlin

“Prospect” is an annual poetry journal, with longer poems written by Australians and published in Australia by Blue Giraffe Press, owned and managed by Peter Macrow. “Prospect Five” is devoted to haiku and tanka, with Beverley George as guest editor. Beverley was president of Haiku Oz, the Australian Haiku Society. She edits and publishes “Eucalypt,” a tanka publication, conducts workshops, and writes essays and children’s books. Her tanka and haiku have earned awards, and some have been translated into Japanese. The cover image and design are by Ron C. Moss, and Rebus Press had charge of layout.

The journal as a whole is unmistakably and delightfully Australian. While some of the vocabulary is special to that country, the themes and emotions are universal. With a few exceptions, I was able to understand and appreciate the poems without resorting to a dictionary, though I did look up some words for their precise meaning and enjoyed this verbal visit to a country and continent so far away.

Haiku, usually three-line poems, are here arranged four to a page, while tanka, which have five lines, are three to a page. They are divided, ten pages of haiku, twelve of tanka, and twelve haiku, with the final two pages given to Blue Giraffe Press 2nd Australian Haiku Competition’s three winners and three commended haiku

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Kokako submissions open November 1, 2015 – deadline February 1, 2016

Kokako is New Zealand’s only journal dedicated to haiku and other related forms – it is published twice a year.

Submissions will open for its April edition 2016 on November 1, 2015: deadline – February 1, 2016.

Contributors are welcome to offer haiku, senryu, tanka, renga, haibun and reviews – preferably by email – with only one submission per contributor per issue, comprising no more than 8 poems/ pieces.

Submissions should be inserted into the body of an email (not added as an attachment) and sent to editors Patricia Prime and Margaret Beverland at:

kokakonz@gmail.com

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A Hundred Gourds 4:4 released

It’s the first day of spring in Melbourne. Blossoms are blooming, peas and broad beans are shooting up and the snails are leaving ample evidence that they’ve come out of hibernation. In North America, the bushfire/wildfire season is waning and the milder days of autumn approaching. The world still turns.

Welcome to the 16th issue of “A Hundred Gourds”, a quarterly journal of haiku, haibun, haiga, tanka and renku poetry is now online for your reading pleasure.

www.ahundredgourds.com

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A Hundred Gourds 4:3 released

Yesterday, Lorin Ford – Haiku Editor, Managing Editor for “A Hundred Gourds” – wrote:

Outside my window is the first rainbow of my Melbourne winter, which begins today. Those in the Northern Hemisphere will soon be welcoming summer. Wherever you are in the world, the 15th issue of “A Hundred Gourds”, a quarterly journal of haiku, haibun, haiga, tanka and renku poetry is now online for your reading pleasure:
www.ahundredgourds.com

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“Windfall 3’\ Launch in Hobart, February 20th 2015

The launch by Robyn Mathison of “Windfall” issue 3 took place at the Allport Library and Museum in Hobart, with the prior launch of a haiku book by Ron C Moss facilitating the use of this excellent location, and an interested and informed audience of about sixty people already in place.

Peter Macrow, founder and manager of “Windfall”, was present, as was I as editor. “Windfall” poets in attendance included Marilyn Humbert, visiting Tasmania from Sydney, Lyn Reeves, Robyn Mathison, Ron C Moss, Sarah Clarkson, Judith E P Johnson, and Lorraine Haig.

The launch was expertly conducted by respected Tasmanian poet, Robyn Mathison.

Robyn expressed her appreciation to Peter Macrow and his Blue Giraffe Press for “offering poets the chance to be published in this tiny but stylish collection of haiku,” and congratulated the fifty-three poets for moments shared in the sixty-three haiku included in “Windfall 3”.

An extract from Robyn Mathison’s launch speech follows:

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“I’d also like to thank the editor Beverley George and congratulate her on her selection and particularly for the sequencing of the haiku she has chosen. I have taken several leisurely strolls through the pages of “Windfall”, stopping to ponder awhile after each haiku and again after reading the three grouped on each page. In my readings I noticed and appreciated the connections between each trio. Sometimes it is colour that connects them; sometimes it is a season, or movement; or the activities of people, animals and other creatures.

On page three, for instance, it is reference to sound that links them, the completely imagined sound of water tumbling a stone in the middle one.

winter sunshine
an unseen guitar
in a minor key

John Bird

river stone
the current of years
in every shape

Dawn Bruce

wombat bones
dry hollyhocks rattle
by the roadside

Ron C. Moss

On page six, birds make the connection.

lowering sky
the breeze lifts a brolga
into flight

Kent Robinson

rain gauge
the bird bath full
after the storm

Rose van Son

galahs
against a dull sky
the pink parts

Quendryth Young

On page eight, moving and changing light links the images.

windswept rocks
the fisherman’s lantern
comes and goes

Cynthia Rowe

wind chopped light chopped winter bush

Kieran O’Connor

fading daylight
gathers more sky . . .
winter solstice

Jayashree Maniyil

And on page twenty-one, all three are about home.

google earth
I mostly look
at my house

Lynette Arden

he threatens
to sell again
the crunch of a snail’s shell

Bett Angel-Stawarz

holiday over
my backpack sags
on the floor

Duncan Richardson”

Robyn Mathison’s closing remarks included:

“Like one of those miraculous Japanese paper buds that only needs a glass of water to unfold slowly into a flower, this little book needs only quiet reading to expand into dozens of images for the mind’s eye or the mind’s ear and to provide hours of contemplation.

“Windfall 3” is an excellent chance for you to get an inexpensive but very rich collection. I have much pleasure in launching it into the world – and I’d like to invite those contributors who are here this evening to read their haiku from “Windfall”.”

Robyn Mathison

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Although unable to attend the event in person, Australian Haiku Society secretary, Rodney Williams, lent his support to the occasion by producing a tanga; a photograph of a fruit tree with a tanka imposed on it, and gifting copies of this to Peter Macrow, Robyn Mathison, Beverley George and Ron Moss.

with this breeze
such sweet nectarines
as windfall
she gathers together
all those precious poems

Rodney Williams
Beverley George, Editor, “Windfall”

Continue reading ““Windfall 3’\ Launch in Hobart, February 20th 2015”

A Hundred Gourds 4:2 released

The seasons roll around. Today, the first of March, Australia and New Zealand welcome our first day of Autumn, whilst those of you in the Northern Hemisphere are anticipating Spring’s arrival.

Wherever you are in the world, the 14th issue of A Hundred Gourds, a quarterly journal of haiku, haibun, haiga, tanka and renku poetry is now online for your reading pleasure.

www.ahundredgourds.com

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Windfall Issue 3: 2015

‘Windfall: Australian Haiku’ Issue 3 2015 has now been mailed to all subscribers.

The issue features the work of 53 Australian poets and is published by Peter Macrow’s Blue Giraffe Press, edited by Beverley George, with a cover design by Ron C Moss.

The annual submission window for Windfall is July only.

Send up to six haiku on an Australian theme to beverleygeorge@idx.com.au

For subscriptions and all other business, write with an SSAE to the publisher:

Peter Macrow
6/16 Osborne Street
Sandy Bay Tasmania 7005

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