Inaugural Meeting of the Red Dragonflies (akatombo)

The inaugural meeting of the Red Dragonflies (akatombo) was held on the 15th March, with an autumn theme, at the convener’s home in Pymble.

Honoured guest haijin, John Bird, inspired the group with his haiku and commentary as well as sharing methods of organizing a haiku group, informed by his experiences with the Wollumbin and Cloudcatchers Haiku Groups, located near Byron Bay.

On her shady patio, Vanessa Proctor led the members, Dawn Bruce, Barbara Fisher, Beverley George, Cynthia Rowe and Lesley Walter, through a most fruitful afternoon.

Dawn Bruce

Haiku, Zen and the Eternal Now

A workshop for anyone interested in haiku and Zen Buddhism

perched
upon the temple bell
the butterfly sleeps
Buson

The interactive workshop will examine the influence of Zen on the ancient Japanese form of haiku poetry, explain how the two have come together and why Zen has relevance to writing haiku for even those who have little understanding of Zen philosophies.

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Melbourne Haiku Readings – March/April

Haiku Reading – March

“THANGS CAFE”
502 Lygon St East Brunswick 8pm FREE
*
THURSDAY MARCH 20th, 2008.
*
HAIKU NIGHT
Sue Stanford, Carla Sari, Matt Hetherington, Helen Begley
Michael de Valle & Myron Lysenko
*
all poets & haikuists welcome to read in OPEN SECTION
*
Paul Gibson Roy to MC proceedings.
Good food & booze on sale. Free entry
*

Poetry night organized by Paul Gibson.

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The Whole Body Singing: Review by Graham Nunn

The Whole Body Singing is Quendryth Young’s first book of English-language haiku, containing more than one hundred haiku, six haiku sequences and one haibun. Since the publication of her first collection of free verse and traditional poems, Naked in Sepia (2004), Quendryth has devoted much of her life to the haiku way. She co-ordinates the haiku group cloudcatchers, edits the haiku section of the literary magazine, FreeXpresSion, and is a participant with John Bird and Nathalie Buckland in the Wollumbin Haiku Workshop. Continue reading “The Whole Body Singing: Review by Graham Nunn”

Members Publications – Katherine Samuelowicz

each in own future: 55 tanka & unrelated randomly placed photographs from many places

(DVD: tanka & photographs); 324/50 Macquarie St, Teneriffe Qld: Postpressed, 2007

sleeping suburbs apart: conversations with ex-husbands & lovers
(poems, tanka and haiku); Flaxton: PostPressed, 2005.

self portrait with sand: postcards from various places
Flaxton: PostPressed, 2002.

noticing the view: haiku & other poems.
Flaxton: PostPressed, 1999.

INTERVIEW WITH MICHAEL DE VALLE

“Moving Galleries” is an on-going project, initiated by a trio of haijin calling themselves Rooku Troupe. They have been instrumental in getting haiku published on decals in Melbourne’s suburban trains.

Here is an interview with a writer who has his haiku currently riding around the Melbourne tracks.

A writer of poetry, haiku, short stories and novels, Michael de Valle’s poetry has featured in both the Moving Galleries pilot and the Spring 2007 Exhibition. Moving Galleries editor, and poet, Leanne Hills, approached Michael to discuss his influences.

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An Australian Voice?

Recent discussions with some of HaikuOz’s ‘greats’ – notably patron Janice M Bostok and co-founder John Bird – have revealed a common thread of concern. Namely, that some writing of haiku in Australia has, unfortunately, slipped away into the phenomenon of the pretty postcard. In other words, that the spirit and subtlety, that once placed Australian haiku apart from that so frequently written elsewhere, has been submerged to a more mundane, more prosaic form of writing which, in one of my darker moods, I see as:

three ducks
in perfect formation
across a cloud wall

(or to be more strictly ‘correct’: three autumnal ducks/in quite perfect formation/ across a cloud wall)

This opinion is bound to be greeted by indignation, offence and, perhaps, horror. That I accept. I also apologize. I beg, however, that my discussion be accepted in that spirit. As a starting point for further discussion. What I am advocating, is a rethink, a re-examination, of how we are writing haiku in Australia. A move away from the formulae that accept phrasing such as ‘autumn evening’, ‘winter day’, ‘summer afternoon’. In other words, that we look again at the craft of our writing and the spirit of haiku – particularly as it applies to Australia.

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