Haiku Graffiti

IMG_3592 a.jpg

The recent Tasmanian Living Writer’s week saw many activities throughout Tasmania and their popularity was very evident to all.

One of these was Haiku Graffiti an event which was the brain child of Irene Mc Guire of Fullers Bookshop in Hobart. Haiku poet’s Lyn Reeves, Ron Moss, Peter Macrow, and Jenny Barnard were invited to write haiku on the large glass windows outside the store and Irene joined in as well. A pre selected list of words was used and different colour pens which ensured a colourful event. People passing by enjoyed the experience and many were seen reading the haiku. Several other people joined in with a haiku of their own. The local Mercury Newspaper featured a photo and event information, the haiku will stay for about a week and it continues to attract interest.

Continue reading “Haiku Graffiti”

August 13, 2006

Haiku Competition and Haiku Wall Review 2005-06

Maureen Sexton, Chairperson 2006 WA Spring Poetry Festival, Co-Chairperson WA Poets Inc sent HaikuOz the following report

Haiku Competition and Haiku Wall Review 2005-2006

City of Perth Library conducted a Haiku poetry competition which generated interest from around the state with entries ranging from Tom Price to Margaret River. Enquiries were received from people not normally involved with the Library. The amount of interest created by the Spring Poetry Festival organizers was impressive.

Continue reading “August 13, 2006”

Eucalypt

Eucalypt: a tanka journal is the first Australian literary magazine devoted entirely to the 1300 year old genre from Japan which has so much relevance to the way we think and feel today. Information is available from www.eucalypt.info or by writing with an SSAE to Beverley George, Editor: Eucalypt, PO Box 37 Pearl Beach 2256 Australia

Haiku and Visual Art: A Winter Ginko

Martina Taeker, RR for SA, recently conducted a ginko in the Art Gallery of SA and based on her experiences offers some thoughts on how a winter ginko might be conducted indoors.

Are you and your haiku feeling a little tired, cold, or stale? Have you thought about taking a ginko, but put it off because it’s winter and you’re still coughing from the last flu you caught?
Try taking a ginko indoors, at your local art gallery.
Don’t know anything about art? It doesn’t matter. After all you are not intending to write a thesis. You want to enjoy some art, be inspired and invigorated by it, and use this experience to create art by writing haiku.
Artists have been inspiring each other for centuries. It is useful for artists to be exposed to the work of others. You can see what subjects they choose and how different artists tackle a particular subject in different ways.
Remember to observe the people around you in the gallery, but discreetly. People respond to the same piece of art in individual ways and that too is grist for the artistic mill of your pen.
If this is your first visit to a gallery, begin by wandering slowly through it. Notice which art works catches your eye, but don’t stop. Get an overview before focusing in on one area. You might even find that this is more than enough material for one day. In which case you can return for another ginko in a few weeks.

Continue reading “Haiku and Visual Art: A Winter Ginko”