Hobart– a fine place for writing haiku

Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of attending a book launch at the Hobart Bookshop of the ink brushed distance by Lyn Reeves, vice-president of the Australian Haiku Society, manager/owner of Pardalote Press and haiku editor for Famous Reporter. In this book, which features a cover design by Ron Moss, haiku are interspersed with free verse to pleasing effect. The book is published by Walleah Press PO Box 368 North Hobart Tasmania 7002.

I was also delighted to be guest of honour at an enjoyable lunch, hosted by Lyn and Andrew Reeves and to meet haiku poets from the talented Watersmeet Haiku Group, with whom I have corresponded for years, through Yellow Moon and Eucalypt.

Extended meanderings through the amazingly beautiful Botanical Gardens and the lively Salamanca Markets, together the near presence of ocean and mountains, made it obvious why these haiku poets never run out of inspiration.

Beverley George

Haiku on Melbourne’s Trains

The third Moving Galleries exhibition, featuring haiku and rooku by residents of Victoria will be launched in May 2008. This is a wonderful initiative set up by Rooku Troupe (Melbourne haiku poets Lia Hills, Matt Hetherington and Myron Lysenko) in conjunction with Connex Trains and The Committee for Melbourne. This promotion of artwork and haiku has attracted great interest from the public and Melbourne’s commuters.

The haiku are featured on decals which appear on the inside walls of 20 Connex trains. They will remain on the trains for six months.

Continue reading “Haiku on Melbourne’s Trains”

Haiku, Zen and the Eternal Now

Understanding or embracing Zen is not a prerequisite for writing wonderful haiku but even a little contact can expand horizons and help writers take haiku beyond simple commentaries on nature. Sometimes it is useful in any art form to look back to what came before and to look at beginnings for fresh inspiration. That was the workshop’s objective. Not to provide a guided tour of Zen Buddhism. Rather, the objective was to take participants on a journey to extend and stretch minds and our approaches to writing haiku.

To read the complete article by Jacqui Murray click on the following link to download it in Adobe Acrobat PDF format.

Zen and haiku jacqui murray

 

Craigleigh Press release Haiku by Two

Here is a book of haiku that brilliantly charts the seasons: the map of spring to winter nuggetted in compact flashes of vivid images to savour from “robin-song edges of dawn” to “snowy sunrise shiver of morning.”

Becky Alexander and Wendy Visser, masters of the provocative visions haiku revels in unfolding, offer a collaboration to enjoy throughout the year, each season captured with fresh insight in arresting language. Sound and colour in elusive brief lines catch bird and beastie, the homely comfort of den and porch, as the seasons
challenge and embrace. Both humour and haunt fountain through the work.

“Winding lane,” “disappearing shadows” invite you to explore the “wisps” and “curves” that twist their enigmatic beauty as the earth, and you, revolve in a joyful excursion into the theatre of nature.

from a review by Katherine L. Gordon,
Author, Editor, Publisher, Judge and Reviewer, Resident Columnist for Ancient Heart Magazine.