WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 11

Helen Davison (Alstonville, NSW)

‘Haiku are concise poems, without poetic contrivances,
capturing a moment in the present. Set in nature, they
express a universal sensory fact.’
————————————-
Bett Angel-Stawarz (Barmera, SA)

“A haiku is a short poem about the real world that prompts the
reader to make discoveries that enrich their lives”.
————————————-
Leigh Rees (Brunswick Heads, NSW)

‘… implementing a fine-edged scalpel to shape poetic
responses into a simple sculpture that touches a universal
chord in the hearts of listeners/readers.’
————————————-
Rupert Summerson (Canberra, ACT)

‘Seventeen syllables / Japanese season poem / Captures the
essence’
————————————-
David McMurray (Kagoshima City, Japan)

‘An immensely powerful though intrinsically limited instrument,
like the Australian didgeridoo, haiku finds enormous beauty within
severe constraints.’

An interview with Lyn Reeves

Interview with Lyn Reeves on ABC 7ZR

In her afternoon program Siobhan Maiden interviewed Lyn Reeves who read some haiku and talked about how to write them. Siobhan wanted to encourage listeners to text a haiku to their lovers this Valentine’s day. She suggested that haiku would be a wonderful way for people to express their responses to the Victorian bushfires.

Read the full interview here:

Interview with Lyn Reeves

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 10

peterb (Moonset publisher) opines

“Haiku are sensual awarenesses of man, his natural perceptions; Simply recorded (hopefully denouncing influences of the contemporary worlds’ surround) and offered up for others to review, enjoy, and ponder. Thus, challenging each, to create their “own” awareness … their “own” haiku.

————————————-

Nathalie Buckland (Nimbin, NSW)

‘Haiku is a moment in time, sketched in a few words, shaped by the sensory experiences and emotions of the writer.’

————————————-

Agnieszka Niemira (Toowong, Qld) endorses John Bird’s: ‘A haiku is a brief poem, built on sensory images from the environment. It evokes an insight into our world and its peoples.’ and Agnieszka adds:
‘Haiku is an epiphany put into (very few) words.’

————————————-

Gavin Austin ( Elizabeth Bay, NSW)

‘… the snapshot of a moment from life.’

————————————-

Carol Negiar (Chajin -The House of Japanese Green Tea, Paris, France)

“A short poem with 3 lines, which in Japanese corresponds to 5, 7 and 5
syllables, but can stray from that in languages other than Japanese.
Description of a unique moment.a surprise ending. no rhymes. an evoked
season.”

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 9

Naomi Madelin (New Zealand)

‘Haiku is a delicate framework whose spaces provide room for its
words to echo and resonate. It is about what is not said, as much as
what is.’
————————————-

Jo McInerney (Boolarra, Vic)

‘Haiku present moments of insight into the natural world or human
experience. Haiku often suggest a unity in things, a point of connection
between the human and the natural world or between two aspects of the
natural world.’
————————————-

Carolyn Alfonzetti (Epping, NSW)

When writing a haiku Carolyn aims to create:
“A succinct poem of 17 or fewer syllables when written in English,
free of poetic device ‘frills’ and overt writer comment on the subject, in which
an image from nature is presented to the reader for their response.”
————————————-

Leonie Bingham (Nimbin,NSW)

‘A haiku is an evocative snapshot which captures the extraordinary
in the ordinary through keen observation and sensory perception of
the natural world.’

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 8

Jacqui Murray (Ocean Shores, NSW)

‘Haiku are brief but highly evocative poems imparting fresh, even
startling, images of humanity and the natural world.’
————————————-

Brett Brady (Hawaii, USA)

‘haiku’s a modest composition whose content defines its form… a
breath-length that suggests a narrative… a pebble toss’t into the
reader’s memory; inviting them to ride-the-ripples beyond thought and
contemplation thru knowledge and wisdom into the surprise of
understanding’
————————————-

Margaret Mahoney ( Kingsgrove, NSW )

‘an observation mostly from nature but not always, it is a thought,
a glance, a lasting moment, a perfect picture, penned in time’
————————————-

Cynthia Rowe (Sydney, NSW)

‘Haiku is a poem of universal power, a brief observation on nature
and all its forms.’

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 7

Dick Sanders (Charlestown, NSW)

‘Haiku is of the seasons and the ten thousand things; it evokes; it
never describes.’
————————————-

Carolyn Cordon (Redbanks, SA)

(1) ‘Haiku is a poem describing a moment in nature, with few words.’
(2) ‘Haiku is a joke played by the Japanese on Westerners, who, at
best, only think they get it.’
————————————-

Vidur Jyoti (Gurgaon, India) .

‘It is a tide contained in a ripple.’
————————————-

Max Ryan (New Brighton, NSW)

‘A haiku is a small, undramatic disappearing act where the poet is
lost in the poem. What is left is an overall image that may be
composed of more than one element from nature but that nevertheless
conveys the sense of a single moment.’
————————————-

Can you answer THE question in less than forty words.? Then please tell
John Bird at link removed He is is editing this feature
for us.

Cloudcatchers Summer Ginko No.12

Cloudcatchers (the haiku group on the Far North Coast of NSW) is three years old. On 5 December 2005, thirteen poets assembled at Torakina Park, Brunswick Heads, where the river meets the sea. Last Friday, 12 December 2008, fifteen enthusiasts gathered at the same place for the summer ginko. Nathalie Buckland presented our usual introduction, “I wish to acknowledge the traditional owners of this land, and ask you to think of all of our ancestors, remembering other feet that have trodden this ground before us.”

Continue reading “Cloudcatchers Summer Ginko No.12”

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 6

Graham Nunn (Brisbane, Qld)

‘a short poem that captures the true essence of a moment in time.’
————————————-

Jan Rikken (The Netherlands)

‘For me a Haiku is the “condensation” of a personal feeling evoked
by a natural phenomenon, into a little poem, without the explicit
expression of that feeling.’
————————————-

Duncan Richardson (Brisbane, Qld)

‘ … the classic elements meet what appeals to me in haiku, namely
intensity, capturing the moment and relating to nature in some way, all done in
a very brief manner.’
————————————-

Larry Bole (New York City, USA) Paraphrasing U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Potter Stewart:

“I shall not attempt to define the kinds of material I understand to
be embraced within the shorthand description haiku; and perhaps I
could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I
see it.”