Members’ Publications: Lorin Ford

a wattle seedpod – published by Post Pressed 2008

109 haiku by Lorin Ford, original cover art by Ron Moss
ISBN 978-1921214-34-9, 36pp, AU$10.00 + p&p

Mini-review by Jane Reichhold :

My copy of a wattle seedpod just arrived yesterday and though I will be reviewing it in the October issue of Lynx I wanted you to have my first impressions.

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Book Launch ­­– a wattle seedpod

Haiku Events: Book Launch ­­– a wattle seedpod

Lorin Ford’s first collection of haiku, a wattle seedpod, will be launched on Friday, 25th July 2008 by Kris Hemensley, receiver of The Christopher Brennan Award for poetry, at Melbourne’s best-loved poetry bookshop, Collected Works.

Launch details:
http://laryalee.users.sunwave.net/lorinposter.htm
Book cover, a sample page and mini-reviews by Ferris Gilli, Beverley George and Lyn Reeves are available for viewing at:
http://www.postpressed.com.au/
a wattle seedpod is available from Post Pressed or contact Lorin at lorinmford@bigpond.com

Haiku events – Victoria August 6

THE NEON CITY

Sue Stanford’s English language haiku
launched by Myron Lysenko
MC Lia Hills
with Guy Harris on guitar
Auditorium of the Japanese Studies Centre
(Bld 54, the grey building west of the bus loop)
Clayton Campus, Monash University
1:00 for 1:10
Wednesday 6th August

Plus Hiroshima Day Commemoration
with Hideko Nakamura

July 08, 2008

More news from W.A.

Perth haiku poet Maureen Sexton, has had nine haiku published on the Swan River Trust’s new River Guardians website.  The River Guardian website relates to the Swan and Canning Rivers, which flow through the suburbs of Perth.

 

Haiku in the Bulletin, 1899

Flannel-flow’rs dancing
To the dawn on the hill-tops…
The Vision of Spring!

Is this the first prize-winning haiku published in an Australian journal or newspaper? It appeared over the name ‘R. Crawford’ in the Bulletin’s famous Red Page on 12 August 1899 along with 13 other haiku and two haiku sequences. Crawford and his fellow poets were responding to an invitation, extended by A. G. Stephens (aka The Bookfellow), to submit ‘some haikais, which must have an Australasian reference’. Stephens offered 10s. 6d.—roughly the equivalent of a day’s wage—for the best entry received.
Stephens’ interest in the haiku form was piqued by a similar competition run in the British journal Academy and Literature. Both competitions probably stemmed from the publication in England of W. G. Aston’s History of Japanese Literature.

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