Bindii Report Two Zoom meetings in April

On two consecutive Sunday afternoons, April 19 and 26, we assembled and experimented with holding an online meeting. Attendees on the first occasion were Julia Wakefield, Steve Wigg, Maeve Archibald, Lynette Arden, Dawn Colsey and Margaret Dingle. We decided to have a second meeting as Stella Damarjati couldn’t attend the first one, and we also needed to practise with the technology. Continue reading “Bindii Report Two Zoom meetings in April”

Fringe Myrtles special meeting for International Haiku Day

The Fringe Myrtles held a special meeting on the evening of Friday 17th April to celebrate International Haiku Day. Of course, due to the Covid-19 lockdown, the meeting took place virtually on ZOOM. This was our second virtual meeting since the outbreak of coronavirus, and it is clear that we are managing to adapt fairly quickly (some faster than others!) to the technological demands. One of the sweet ironies of this whole pandemic experience, particularly in relation to social distancing, is that technology is allowing us to keep in contact more frequently than usual. Continue reading “Fringe Myrtles special meeting for International Haiku Day”

International Haiku Poetry Day – Haiku String

Today, 17th April 2020, we are celebrating International Haiku Poetry Day by holding a String on the theme of ‘Solitude’. By sharing our haiku we can connect with each other, even in these days of social distancing, self-isolation and working and studying from home.

So that international poets may take part, the String will remain open until Sunday,19th AEST.

AHS invites you to share with us your original, previously unpublished haiku or senryu on the theme of Solitude.  We invite you to explore a multiplicity of ideas on this theme without necessarily using the word ‘solitude’.

The haiku should be linked by the subject of Solitude. It is not necessary for each haiku to relate to the one before it. Continue reading “International Haiku Poetry Day – Haiku String”

Celebrate International Haiku Day 17th April, 2020. Advance Notice.

The Australian Haiku Society encourages haiku poets to take part in activities to celebrate International Haiku Poetry Day. As the current situation we find ourselves in means we cannot gather for readings or other haiku events, we will be holding a Haiku String. We welcome haiku poets worldwide to contribute to the String, on the theme of Solitude.

The String will open on Friday 17th April in the Southern Hemisphere and remain open for contributions until Sunday 19th April to accommodate international poets who may wish to take part. Contributions may be made on the website during these dates (not before).

Autumn Equinox Haiku String 2020

The Australian Haiku Society welcomes contributions from haiku poets worldwide to the AHS Autumn Equinox Haiku String.

We will be holding the String during the day of the Southern Hemisphere Autumn Equinox, which occurs in Australia this year on Friday, 20th March, 2020. The String will remain open for contributions until Sunday 22nd March to accommodate international poets who may wish to take part. Continue reading “Autumn Equinox Haiku String 2020”

Preliminary Announcement: Autumn Equinox Haiku String 2020

The Australian Haiku Society welcomes contributions from haiku poets worldwide to the AHS Autumn Equinox Haiku String.

We will be holding the String during the day of the Southern Hemisphere Autumn Equinox, which occurs in Australia this year on Friday 20th March, 2020. The String will remain open for contributions until Sunday 22nd March to accommodate international poets who may wish to take part. Contributions may be made on the website during these dates (not before).

Haiku String – Instructions

AHS invites you to share with us your original, previously unpublished haiku or senryu on the theme of Relationships.  We invite you to explore a multiplicity of ideas in the String without necessarily using the word ‘relationship’.

The haiku will be linked by the subject of Relationships. It is not necessary for each haiku to relate to the one before it.

  1. Please contribute up to three of your best previously unpublished haiku or senryu.
  2. Haiku should be posted in the comment box at the end of the post.
  3. Each poem posted must be original work by the poet making the post. Please include your name below each haiku as you wish it to appear.

Posting your work in the AHS Autumn Equinox String 2020 assumes the following:

Copyright of each haiku remains with the author. We request nonexclusive permission to publish your work on AHS website and to republish it in any future online collections on the AHS website.

Report of January 25 Bindii Meeting.

Six of us met at the State Library for a two-hour discussion and critique session. Members present were Maeve Archibald, Lynette Arden, Stella Damarjati, Margaret Fensom, Julia Wakefield and Steve Wigg. We had apologies from Marilyn Linn, Jane Harris and Dawn Colsey.

Stella led the session with some definitions and examples of wabi and sabi techniques, quoting Jane Reichhold, and then between us we tried to define the difference if any between the two concepts. Reichhold translates sabi as aged/loneliness, while she equates wabi with poverty. Continue reading “Report of January 25 Bindii Meeting.”

Results of the Australian Haiku Society Summer Solstice 2019 Haiga Kukai: Seasonal

MOSS-Summer
Ron Moss

 

1st Place

fiery sunset
a single red blossom
on the blackened branch

Louise Hopewell

 

There is no doubt that the weather is changing and that there is a climate emergency upon us. In Australia the records keep being broken, records of storms, high temperatures, low rainfall, and continuous drought, all of which have beset our beautiful country. I chose this photograph, which I captured on a recent deployment in Queensland fighting the bushfires with other Tasmanian crews, to use for the seasonal image for the Kukai. The fire was out of control and burning over the surrounding mountains. I was looking for haiku that worked with the power of the image to bring us an emotional connection. Louise has captured very well the danger of the scene, but she has also expressed an overwhelming feeling of hope. Things have their time and place, but there will be rebirth. A lot to pack into a one-breath three line haiku, but I think it has been achieved very well indeed and so I would like to award it a worthy first place. Continue reading “Results of the Australian Haiku Society Summer Solstice 2019 Haiga Kukai: Seasonal”