Cloudcatchers Ginko No.47 (Spring)

Report by Quendryth Young

At last the drought has broken and we are overjoyed, but quietly disappointed that it rained on our ginko. Ten of us gathered at the site of the old Bangalow Weir, which was constructed across Byron Creek in 1924 to create a swimming pool for local residents. Carnivals were held over many years, and even attracted Olympic champions (such as Andrew [Boy] Charlton and Arne Borg, the Swedish swimmer).

Cloudcatchers first held a ginko here in summer 2007, again in spring 2008, spring in 2009, autumn in 2011 and winter in 2016. We watched the weir deteriorate, but restoration work in 2016 and local involvement in replanting has saved this iconic feature. A fishway was constructed to facilitate the movement of Australian bass swimming upstream, and includes habitat for platypus. A sign by the creek reads:

‘Jahna ngali garimaleh jogun’ or ‘Let’s stand together look after country’. Continue reading “Cloudcatchers Ginko No.47 (Spring)”

The Mystery of Haiku : by Jan Dobb

book on rock
photo: Ron Moss

Why do I read and write haiku?
Like so many people, I guess, I’ve always been intrigued by what I can only call the mystery of life. What are we? Questions, questions, questions . . . In younger and more certain days I looked for answers and followed many trails only to end up with even more questions. Now, in my ageing and more mellow days I’ve come to accept questions for just what they are – questions. At last I allow mystery to be mystery. And this is where haiku fits in.

Continue reading “The Mystery of Haiku : by Jan Dobb”

The Wonder Code by Scott Mason

Associate editor of The Heron’s Nest, Scott Mason, has released a new book entitled The Wonder Code: Discover the Way of Haiku and See the World with New Eyes. John Stevenson, the managing editor of The Heron’s Nest writes, “The Wonder Code is both a book about haiku and a book of haiku. It contains five linked essay chapters by Scott (plus an Introduction and Afterword) as well as five extensive ‘galleries’ of haiku poems, each related to the theme of its preceding chapter. Altogether the volume features more than 450 standout haiku, all of which first appeared in The Heron’s Nest in the last two decades. And for those who have come to appreciate Scott’s own work, the book includes a separate, generous selection of his haiku.” Continue reading “The Wonder Code by Scott Mason”

Report on Bindii Japanese Genre Poetry Group Meeting: 7 October 2017

Our follow up haibun workshop presented by Maeve Archibald was an opportunity to share the haibun written from the prompts provided at our August workshop. Six members attended and read work on a variety of subjects that had stimulated their imagination. Helpful critique and suggestions followed each reading.

As a further follow up, Lee Bentley, liaising with Maeve, will intermittently email some writing stimulus ideas to members. It is hoped that this will provide some continuity between our bimonthly meetings. Continue reading “Report on Bindii Japanese Genre Poetry Group Meeting: 7 October 2017”

Fleeting Nature: by Matt Hetherington

rhodo
photo: Ron Moss

For me, haiku is a way of capturing the fleeting nature of nature. No other poetic form seems suited so well to bringing the delicateness of the world to the page, and to illuminating the way things balance before they fall over or take flight. Or something close to both, as in this one by Issa (maybe my favourite of all haijin), translated by R.H.Blyth:

 

striking the fly
i hit also
a flowering plantxxxxxxxxxxxx
Continue reading “Fleeting Nature: by Matt Hetherington”

Genjuan International Haibun Contest 2018

The Genjuan Contest office is now open to receive your submissions for 2018. Closing deadline will be 31st of January. The organizers, Hailstone Haiku Circle, greatly value participation from overseas. One of last year’s four judges, Ellis Avery, is retiring in order to study nursing full time back in her native USA, and her place as judge will be taken by Angelee Deodhar of Chandigarh, India. Some of you may know her wonderful series of ‘Journeys’ anthologies, each of which gathers more than 100 haibun works. Nenten Tsubo’uchi’s title has changed to emeritus judge, reflecting the special assistance he gives the final part of the judging process. Hisashi Miyazaki and myself continue in office for another year. The rules remain the same as last year also found on the link below.
How about entering a piece or two? There are real prizes and certificates and it’s free. Address of our officer, Eiko Mori, and other details are given in the Genjuan 2018 Guidelines (reached via Icebox top page – see website).

With best wishes for the autumn (spring, Down Under)!

Stephen Henry Gill (Tito), Kyoto, Japan