WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 9

Naomi Madelin (New Zealand)

‘Haiku is a delicate framework whose spaces provide room for its
words to echo and resonate. It is about what is not said, as much as
what is.’
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Jo McInerney (Boolarra, Vic)

‘Haiku present moments of insight into the natural world or human
experience. Haiku often suggest a unity in things, a point of connection
between the human and the natural world or between two aspects of the
natural world.’
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Carolyn Alfonzetti (Epping, NSW)

When writing a haiku Carolyn aims to create:
“A succinct poem of 17 or fewer syllables when written in English,
free of poetic device ‘frills’ and overt writer comment on the subject, in which
an image from nature is presented to the reader for their response.”
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Leonie Bingham (Nimbin,NSW)

‘A haiku is an evocative snapshot which captures the extraordinary
in the ordinary through keen observation and sensory perception of
the natural world.’

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 8

Jacqui Murray (Ocean Shores, NSW)

‘Haiku are brief but highly evocative poems imparting fresh, even
startling, images of humanity and the natural world.’
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Brett Brady (Hawaii, USA)

‘haiku’s a modest composition whose content defines its form… a
breath-length that suggests a narrative… a pebble toss’t into the
reader’s memory; inviting them to ride-the-ripples beyond thought and
contemplation thru knowledge and wisdom into the surprise of
understanding’
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Margaret Mahoney ( Kingsgrove, NSW )

‘an observation mostly from nature but not always, it is a thought,
a glance, a lasting moment, a perfect picture, penned in time’
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Cynthia Rowe (Sydney, NSW)

‘Haiku is a poem of universal power, a brief observation on nature
and all its forms.’

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 7

Dick Sanders (Charlestown, NSW)

‘Haiku is of the seasons and the ten thousand things; it evokes; it
never describes.’
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Carolyn Cordon (Redbanks, SA)

(1) ‘Haiku is a poem describing a moment in nature, with few words.’
(2) ‘Haiku is a joke played by the Japanese on Westerners, who, at
best, only think they get it.’
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Vidur Jyoti (Gurgaon, India) .

‘It is a tide contained in a ripple.’
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Max Ryan (New Brighton, NSW)

‘A haiku is a small, undramatic disappearing act where the poet is
lost in the poem. What is left is an overall image that may be
composed of more than one element from nature but that nevertheless
conveys the sense of a single moment.’
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Can you answer THE question in less than forty words.? Then please tell
John Bird at link removed He is is editing this feature
for us.

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 6

Graham Nunn (Brisbane, Qld)

‘a short poem that captures the true essence of a moment in time.’
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Jan Rikken (The Netherlands)

‘For me a Haiku is the “condensation” of a personal feeling evoked
by a natural phenomenon, into a little poem, without the explicit
expression of that feeling.’
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Duncan Richardson (Brisbane, Qld)

‘ … the classic elements meet what appeals to me in haiku, namely
intensity, capturing the moment and relating to nature in some way, all done in
a very brief manner.’
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Larry Bole (New York City, USA) Paraphrasing U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Potter Stewart:

“I shall not attempt to define the kinds of material I understand to
be embraced within the shorthand description haiku; and perhaps I
could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I
see it.”

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 5

Bob Jones (Bingal Bay, Qld)

“A renga-related nature-based poem whose plain imagery evokes a particular moment, stripped to its most telling features, classically intimating the quick of all moments.”
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Janice M Bostok (in collaboration with John Bird)
“A haiku is a brief poem, built on sensory images from the real world. It evokes a personal insight into how people are connected to their environment.”
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Bea Holmes along with a number of others, favours the current definition of the Haiku Society of America:
“A haiku is a short poem that uses imagistic language to convey the essence of an experience of nature or the season intuitively linked to the human condition.”
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Lorin Ford (Melbourne, Vic) Her working description (not definition) is
‘Haiku in English are brief poems about observable things. Haiku suggest connections and relationships between the things of nature and human life. Abstractions are avoided, as is the overt use poetic devices such as metaphor, simile and other tropes.’

WHAT IS HAIKU? – Week 4

Dawn Bruce (Sydney, NSW)

‘The writing of haiku captures a moment that reveals the extraordinary in the ordinary; it allows one to slow down and value the present; it enables one to forget the ego and feel the miracle of nature; more than anything it is the heart of poetry.’
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Alison Williams (UK)
‘A haiku is a short poem that finds the intangible in the tangible.’

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Janet Howie (Melbourne, Vic)

‘Haiku is a concise poetic form that captures a keenly perceived and felt moment in nature, leading to further reflection on universal human experience.’
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Merle Packham (Alstonville, NSW)

“A haiku is a brief poem expressing a moment of observation, with
awareness of all the senses to nature, the seasons, and one’s
surroundings.”

What is Haiku? – Week 3

Katherine Gallagher (UK)

(1) “Haiku is a brief season-oriented poem of Japanese origin but
increasingly adapted to Western usage and local tastes. A haiku mirrors
a moment’s experience often shown via contrasting images – the so-called
‘haiku moment’ bringing about a. sudden illumination to dramatic
effect.”

(2) and Katherine’s short description:
“Haiku is a brief poem about the sensory vibrancy of the planet.”

Maureen Sexton (Perth, WA)
“Haiku exalts nature by recording, in as few words as possible,
something from the natural world that creates an insight which
resonates with the reader.”

What is Haiku – Week 2

Dhugal Lindsay (Yokosuka, Japan) believes English language haiku should aspire to be:

“Short poem of rhythmical structure, usually between 7 and 17 syllables in length. It contains a reference to a seasonal or otherwise natural entity, is concrete, and illuminates some aspect of the existence of one or more of the elements or entities within the poem.”

Dhugal and John Bird collaborated for this short description:

“A haiku is a brief poem, built on sensory images from the environment. It evokes an insight into Our world and The world.”

Cynthia Ludlow (Brisbane, Qld)

“Haiku are small nature poems that I don’t understand but know to be true.”