Launch of Bushfire Moon

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Ron Moss and Heather Scandrett at the launch of Bushfire Moon

On the 24th March, in the beautiful surrounds of the Allport Library in Hobart, I had the honour of launching Ron Moss’s recent book, Bushfire Moon, with the following words:

I first met Ron about seventeen years ago when his friend Ross Coward brought him along to a meeting of the then recently formed haiku group, Watersmeet. I remember sitting around the long table in the Salamanca Arts Centre meeting room. We had each brought along an object from nature as a prompt for writing, and when it came to sharing our jottings I was struck by the detailed observation and insight in the pieces Ron read out. I can still see the trail of tiny black ants Continue reading “Launch of Bushfire Moon”

Marking the Moment – workshop

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Capture and record a moment from nature through haiku and mark making to create a visual expression of a sensory experience. Join poet Lyn Reeves and local artist Desiree Fitzgibbon for walking and observation in the stunning environment of Okines Beach.

At the end of this workshop we will have uncovered the features of the brief nature poem and composed our own haiku and brush work images depicting a special moment in time on a handmade paper scroll. Continue reading “Marking the Moment – workshop”

Small Worlds – new haiku from Lyn Reeves

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Small Worlds is a book/catalogue of paintings in an exhibition by Hobart painter, Luke Wagner. Each of fifteen paintings of bonsai is accompanied by a haiku by Lyn, in a limited edition, beautifully presented hard cover publication. Paintings and book details can be viewed at http://www.colvillegallery.com.au/artists/lukewagner.php

The book was launched at the exhibition opening on the 5th March and is available from the gallery and from Hobart Bookshop.

Watersmeet Spring Ginko

Saturday 5th November  10.30 am, Cascade Gardens Hobart.

We are a little late with our Spring ginko, but hopefully the winds and the rain will have eased in two weeks’ time when we plan to meet at the bottom end of Cascade Gardens, near the play area. There is a car park at the entrance from MacRobie’s Rd, and a smaller one at the top near the brewery.

We will have a choice of walking up into the gardens, taking side-tracks and/or walking part of the Linear Track along the Rivulet. Afterwards it’s a short walk or drive to Hamlet Coffee Shop where we can share our haiku drafts and discuss the article by Ferris Gill on Seasoning your Haiku; perhaps you’d also like to bring your own ideas for season words. Continue reading “Watersmeet Spring Ginko”

Bob Jones’s “Haiku Nature” on THF

 

Bob Jones’s instructive and accessible PhD dissertation “Haiku Nature”, most chapters of which were published over six years in Modern Haiku, is now available as a download from The Haiku Foundation’s Digital Library. It can be accessed at http://www.thehaikufoundation.org/omeka/items/show/2361

You can also view some of Bob’s thoughts on karumi in haiku, reposted from the HaikuOz archives, in Haiku Musings.

Karumi – Bob Jones on lightness in haiku

The following thoughts first appeared on the HaikuOz website in 2001, originally posted by John Bird.

It comes as no surprise that when Janice Bostok visited Bob Jones, they spent a morning talking about haiku. Bob raised the subject of “karumi” and explained that karumi is the mood of lightness which informs much of Basho’s late-life poetry and that few western poets seem to have engaged it in their haiku. Bob gave this example of Basho’s karumi:

so cool
 the wall against my feet
 a noonday nap~

When editing submissions to FAHA (First Australian Haiku Anthology), Janice Bostok and I noted a leaning towards profundity, and we thought Bob’s comments might provide counterpoise. With the permission of all concerned, I quote from a letter Bob subsequently sent to Janice, and in which Bob returns to his theme. ……….. John Bird.

“A couple of important issues were raised that we didn’t have enough time to explore. One of them concerned the mood of karumi, which has been a chief interest of mine over the years, particularly in relation to my own haiku. You asked for my understanding of it and I couldn’t easily come up with an explanation. I think most serious students of haiku have a hard time coming to terms with Basho’s later works. In many respects the poems seem bland and a little bit thin. Basho himself likens karumi to shallow water over a sandy bed, which certainly seems to go against any sense of mystery or depth. However I think the main thing to get from this likeness is the idea of transparency. Nothing’s hidden, or even hideable, in the mood of karumi. Everything’s out there, plainly shown. Everything’s part of the open secret. Continue reading “Karumi – Bob Jones on lightness in haiku”