Number Eight Wire – Review by Vanessa Proctor

anthology coverNumber Eight Wire is the long-awaited Fourth New Zealand Haiku Anthology. The last anthology, the excellent The Taste of Nashi, was published a decade ago. The title Number Eight Wire is a reference from a haiku by Karen Peterson Butterworth to the New Zealand trait of innovation and resourcefulness – to be able to mend anything with number eight wire. It’s a fitting title which holds together a strong selection of 330 haiku from 70 poets which are, as the editors state in the introduction, ‘100% pure Aotearoa’, yet also universal. Continue reading “Number Eight Wire – Review by Vanessa Proctor”

Persimmon

This book is a delight, square in shape and persimmon-coloured, it is beautifully produced with deep green flyleaf covers and plenty of space around the text giving the haiku the room it deserves. The artwork of persimmons on the front cover by Eiko Mori and Richard Steiner’s artwork on the back is appealing and gives the reader the impression that a great deal of thought has gone into this book’s creation. Continue reading “Persimmon”

Blowing up Balloons – review

A collaboration between Vanessa Proctor and Gregory Piko, Blowing up Balloons, is a collection of 90 haiku and senryu about the experience of becoming and being a parent. The moments shared relate to the stages in a child’s life from the first hint of pregnancy:

distracted the curve of a new moon

to the early years of childhood:

bathtime / they re-enact the sinking/ of the titanic

walking home from ballet/ my daughter pirouettes/ through the blossom

These sensitive and tender poems evoke a sense of wonder and amazement that bringing a new life into the world gives rise to, and of the joy that can be found in the presence of these little human beings entrusted to our care. The opening haiku perfectly encapsulates this:  Continue reading “Blowing up Balloons – review”

Paper Wasp Volume 22, number 2, winter 2016: Review by Vanessa Proctor

It seems hard to believe that this issue is the last print edition of paper wasp.  Paper wasp, a quarterly journal of haiku, and Australia’s first dedicated haiku journal, has been part of the Australian literary landscape for over twenty years.  Its journey towards publication began in Brisbane, with John Knight, Jacqui Murray and Ross Clark as the founding editors.  Subsequently Janice Bostok and Katherine Samuelowicz joined the editorial team.

Much has changed in the Australian haiku scene over the last two decades.  Poets have come and gone and new poets have emerged as haiku has become increasingly popular worldwide. The journal has increased the number of haiku in each issue over the years while retaining the same format. Continue reading “Paper Wasp Volume 22, number 2, winter 2016: Review by Vanessa Proctor”

Review of ‘Windfall’ in ‘A Hundred Gourds’ 5.3

Included in the Expositions section of the final edition of A Hundred Gourds – just released – is a review of Windfall 4, written by Australian haiku poet Jo McInerney, who is becoming increasingly respected as a commentator on haiku.

Through accessing the following link, readers will be able to appreciate Jo’s response to the latest edition of Windfall, an annual selection of Australian haiku edited by Beverley George and published by Peter Macrow’s Blue Giraffe Press:

http://www.ahundredgourds.com/

Review of “Prospect Five” – Dorothy McLaughlin

“Prospect” is an annual poetry journal, with longer poems written by Australians and published in Australia by Blue Giraffe Press, owned and managed by Peter Macrow. “Prospect Five” is devoted to haiku and tanka, with Beverley George as guest editor. Beverley was president of Haiku Oz, the Australian Haiku Society. She edits and publishes “Eucalypt,” a tanka publication, conducts workshops, and writes essays and children’s books. Her tanka and haiku have earned awards, and some have been translated into Japanese. The cover image and design are by Ron C. Moss, and Rebus Press had charge of layout.

The journal as a whole is unmistakably and delightfully Australian. While some of the vocabulary is special to that country, the themes and emotions are universal. With a few exceptions, I was able to understand and appreciate the poems without resorting to a dictionary, though I did look up some words for their precise meaning and enjoyed this verbal visit to a country and continent so far away.

Haiku, usually three-line poems, are here arranged four to a page, while tanka, which have five lines, are three to a page. They are divided, ten pages of haiku, twelve of tanka, and twelve haiku, with the final two pages given to Blue Giraffe Press 2nd Australian Haiku Competition’s three winners and three commended haiku

Continue reading “Review of “Prospect Five” – Dorothy McLaughlin”

Review of “Haiku Bindii: Willow Light”

The following review has been written by Patricia Prime (NZ), editor of “Kokako”:

“Haiku Bindii: Willow Light. Journal of Bindii Japanese Genre Poetry Group 2015: Volume 2” has been edited by Lee Bentley, with layout and design by Lynette Arden.

Payment can be made via Paypal to lee.bentley@y7mail.com 1. $10AUD; 2. $15AUD; 3 $24 AUD; 4. $30 AUD. 5 or more copies, please contact Lee for details.

“Haiku Bindii: Willow Light” is the Bindii Japanese Genre Poetry Group’s second collection from Australian poets. Haiga inside front and back covers and throughout the book are by Belinda Broughton. The collection is composed of haiku, tanka, tanka prose and haibun.

Continue reading “Review of “Haiku Bindii: Willow Light””

Launch of “The Bone Carver” by Ron C. Moss

On Friday, February 20th, Hobartians welcomed the long-awaited arrival of Ron C. Moss’s prize-winning haiku collection, “The Bone Carver” (Snapshot Press, 2014), at the Allport Library and Museum of Fine Arts.

http://www.snapshotpress.co.uk/books/the_bone_carver.htm

In her launch speech, Beverley George – past president of the Australian Haiku Society – began by giving an overview of the nature of haiku and of its current practice, citing John Bird’s description of the form:

“A haiku is a brief poem, built on sensory images from the environment. It invokes an insight into our world and its peoples.”

Continue reading “Launch of “The Bone Carver” by Ron C. Moss”